Re-creating Ernest Shackleton’s Scotch and Epic Voyage

Ernest Shackleton’s epic Antarctic adventure is a story of men heroically overcoming adverse conditions, and I’ve long admired the story.

Recently, Shackleton’s scotch was in the news.  After being located encased in ice underneath his Antarctic hut, the scotch was re-created in the lab.

Today I read that a group of modern day adventurers re-enacted Shackleton’s voyage successfully, though unlike Shackleton, once they made landful on South Georgia island they utilized tents as they made their way to the same whaling station Shackleton did in his efforts to save his men.

While I enjoy adventures, I do not think I would enjoy sailing across 800 miles of cold ocean in as small of a craft as Shackleton and these re-creators did.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 02/12 at 12:44 PM
  1. When I watched the Shackleton voyage documentary on TV, I think it was PBS, I couldn’t move from the couch. When hands literally froze to the oars as they rowed boats to South Georgia… I thought, man, I will never bitch about having to shovel snow again.

    Posted by RKN  on  02/12  at  03:56 PM
  2. RKN, I’m fairly certain it was on NOVA (PBS show).  Those men had grit.

    Posted by John Venlet  on  02/12  at  04:12 PM
  3. Cold water sailing is truly some Bad Bad Juju.

    Posted by Yabu  on  02/12  at  06:33 PM
  4. I don’t think I’d like to do that trip.  However, I would be partial, and would not object, to a re-enactment of Lewis and Clark’s journey on the Missouri with the caveat of just doing the downstream portion.

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  02/12  at  06:44 PM
  5. Yabu, about the closest I’ve come to cold water sailing was a long surface transit out of Yokosuka when I was on the LA, SSN688.  I pulled a conning tower watch for this transit, in heavy seas and cold weather, and though typically this is an enjoyable watch station, say if you’re making the transit out of Pearl, Guam, or Diego Garcia, I was never so happy as when we cleared the conn to dive.  It was a cold, wet transit.

    Posted by John Venlet  on  02/12  at  08:15 PM
  6. Wizard, the Lewis & Clark trip would be great, and just think of the rivers, streams and cricks we could wet a line on!

    Posted by John Venlet  on  02/12  at  08:16 PM
  7. Hmm, I’ve a foggy recall of blogging about my raptness over this documentary in the far distant and unsearchable past.

    Posted by RKN  on  02/12  at  10:37 PM
  8. Ok, Shackleton has for quite some time been one of my heroes. And a true hero he was. In all of his epic adventures, he NEVER lost a man. During his 18 month ordeal, after the Endurance was crushed in the ice, he helped maintain order by having his most troublesome crewmen bunk in his tent.
    I confess, when I saw the whiskey you mention, I didn’t hesitate. Despite the steep cost, I ordered a 5th.
    When it arrived, I opened it, poured a shot, hoisted my glass and made the same toast a grizzled 30 year Norwegian veteran of the southern whaling trade stood and said at a dinner at the whaling station for Shackleton and his comrades who made that epic voyage after they detailed their ordeal to those in attendance. “These are men.”
    Oh, and the whiskey, IT WAS GREAT!

    Posted by Tim P  on  02/13  at  12:40 AM
  9. Tim, Shackleton is indeed a heroic man.

    During his 18 month ordeal, after the Endurance was crushed in the ice, he helped maintain order by having his most troublesome crewmen bunk in his tent.

    That’s putting the advice, “Keep your friends close and your enemies closer,” into action.

    If I was up Alaska way, Tim, I’d enjoy lifting a glass of that scotch whisky to Shackleton myself.

    Posted by John Venlet  on  02/13  at  03:19 PM

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