Don’t Burn In The Camps Later

A well know quote from Aleksandr I. Solzhenitsyn is as follows.

“And how we burned in the camps later, thinking: What would things have been like if every Security operative, when he went out at night to make an arrest, had been uncertain whether he would return alive and had to say good-bye to his family? Or if, during periods of mass arrests, as for example in Leningrad, when they arrested a quarter of the entire city, people had not simply sat there in their lairs, paling with terror at every bang of the downstairs door and at every step on the staircase, but had understood they had nothing left to lose and had boldly set up in the downstairs hall an ambush of half a dozen people with axes, hammers, pokers, or whatever else was at hand?... The Organs would very quickly have suffered a shortage of officers and transport and, notwithstanding all of Stalin’s thirst, the cursed machine would have ground to a halt! If…if…We didn’t love freedom enough. And even more – we had no awareness of the real situation…. We purely and simply deserved everything that happened afterward.”

This quote is quite pertinent, today, considering the attitudes of those holding what they believe are the reigns to power here in America.

Don’t burn in the camps later because you (we) did not love freedom enough.  Some additional thoughts to consider on this subject can be found in two recent essays.  First, as posted at Western Rifle Shooters Association, and originally posted at Resistor in the Rockies, Matt Bracken’s Stick To Your Guns!.

Second, Gary Harper’s A REASONABLE PROPOSAL FOR RULES OF ENGAGEMENT DURING THE COMING TRIBULATION

Link to Harper’s piece via The Gunslinger.

I repeat.  Don’t burn in the camps later.

UPDATE (01.14.2013): Updated link to WRSA post for most recent content.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 01/11 at 02:17 PM
  1. Interesting John,
    However reading “A Reasonable Proposal…” it seems too facile, too glib, and not really thought through. There was one statement he made where he said, “You will need to think like the Viet Cong did.” Which specifically I take exception to, though there are others.

    Really? Think like a communist terrorist organization who held sway in villages and hamlets through summary execution, torture, and terror?

    Who lost almost all of their engagements with U.S. and ARVN forces and were so totally decimated after Tet that they ceased to become a viable organization and the North Vietnamese had to effectively take over operations? Those Viet Cong? Uhm, no thanks.

    I highly recommend reading A Better War: The Unexamined Victories and Final Tragedy of America’s Last Years in Vietnam by Lewis Sorley.

    From the flap,

    “Neglected by scholars and journalists alike, the years of conflict in Vietnam from 1968 to 1975 offer surprises not only about how the war was fought, but about what was achieved. Drawing on authoritative materials not previously available, including thousands of hours of tape-recorded allied councils of war, award-winning military historian Lewis Sorley has given us what has long been needed-an insightful, factual, and superbly documented history of these important years. Among his findings is that the war was being won on the ground even as it was being lost at the peace table and in the U.S. Congress. The story is a great human drama of purposeful and principled service in the face of an agonizing succession of lost opportunities, told with uncommon understanding and compassion. Sorley documents the dramatic differences in conception, conduct, and-at least for a time-results between the early and the later war. Meticulously researched and movingly told, A Better War is sure to stimulate controversy as it sheds brilliant new light on the war in Vietnam.”

    This book goes a long ways towards correcting the misinformation, distortion, and outright lies that became the conventional ‘narrative’ of Vietnam after the war.

    As for our situation, the best course of action at present is to write your congressional delegation and let them know in no uncertain terms that you are against meaningless restrictions on the second amendment and that you WILL hold them accountable at the polls. Let your local and state politicians know where you stand too. Join the NRA if you’re not already a member and go buy a gun.

    Posted by Tim P  on  01/12  at  04:05 PM
  2. People clinging to that 2nd amendment nonsense are already lost and should go buy a clue.

    I’ll sum it up like this: “Nobody gets to steal my stuff, ever.”

    That would be true even if there was no 2nd amendment.

    If you don’t own yourself and all your stuff then what are you even doing here?

    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  01/12  at  11:12 PM
  3. Tim, I agree that Harper’s utilization of the Viet Cong as an example to emulate probably is not the wisest.  The Finns’ defeat of the Russians in WWII might be a better example, though since then, the Finns have defeated themselves by embracing socialist ideals.

    I’ll look for Sorley’s book, because I have not read it.  Have you read Stanley Karnow’s Vietnam: A History?  I thought Karnow’s book quite good, and indepth.

    As for our situation, the best course of action at present is to write your congressional delegation and let them know in no uncertain terms that you are against meaningless restrictions on the second amendment and that you WILL hold them accountable at the polls. Let your local and state politicians know where you stand too. Join the NRA if you’re not already a member and go buy a gun.

    I’m less confident in your suggestions, here, with the exception of buying a gun.  There is no accountability in America’s political system any longer, and I have no faith in it.

    Posted by John Venlet  on  01/13  at  11:03 AM
  4. John,

    I like the Finns as an example too. Good choice.
    Karnow’s history of Vietnam I haven’t read, yet.
    I’m finishing Stalin by Radzinski. I highly recommend it. There are many apt parallels to what’s going on today in his descriptions of how the Bolsheviks managed to get and hold on to power.
    Also in how the left used the so-called intelligentsia and media. Especially credulous westerners. It’s chilling.

    As for having lost faith. I’m not far from it, but not quite there yet. National politics is a sewer. Where we can make a difference is at the local and state level. National level change will only happen in response to local and state level change. When you build a house, you start at the foundation. It’s what the left did with the takeover of public education, arts, and media. Though late, I hope there is still time.

    Posted by Tim P  on  01/13  at  07:31 PM
  5. National level change will only happen in response to local and state level change.

    Tim, while I am in agreement with your statement, here, facts do not support local and state level changes having any effect on national level change.  I’ll use just one historical, recent historical, example to illustrate why I have no confidence in the effectiveness of your statement.

    Failed political aspirant Pat Miles, who is a dues paying member of the Harvard law school class of ‘91 mafia, and recipient of Obama back scratching favoritism, recently gave a speech to the Federal Bar Association on the subject of Michigan marijuana prosecutions.

    Michigan recently relaxed their medical marijuana laws, because this is the will of the people, and thus the will of the state.  But what does Pat Miles have to say about this in his capacity as an agent of the federal government, and thus as a mouthpiece for the federal government?  This.

    A Michigan medical marijuana license to grow or a card to use only give immunity under State law, not Federal,” he said.

    He said under federal law the use of marijuana is still illegal so the Western District of Michigan will just continue to follow the law.

    The State of Michigan is hardly unique, here, in having federal laws trump state laws, and this is just one area of overreach by the federal government into state rights, there are numerous others, as I am certain you are aware.

    The facts, unfortunately, in reality do not support state and local level changes having much effect at all on national level change.

    Posted by John Venlet  on  01/14  at  08:06 AM
  6. John:

    Thanks for the link.

    Matt updated what had started as a Free Republic post and asked me to post the revised version:

    http://westernrifleshooters.wordpress.com/2013/01/13/bracken-stick-to-your-guns-no-matter-what/

    Would you mind updating the link in your piece?

    Thanks.

    Keep swinging.

    Posted by concerned american  on  01/14  at  09:51 AM
  7. CA, done, and thanks for all you do at WRSA.

    Posted by John Venlet  on  01/14  at  10:01 AM

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